Namevine is the easiest way to search for a domain name and matching social media profiles.

For example, Namevine can be found on it’s domain (namevine.com), on Twitter (twitter.com/namevine) and on Facebook (facebook.com/namevine).

Make sure the same is true about your brand, product or service!

Who Built Namevine?

Namevine is built by me, Mike Jarema.  I’m an independent developer based out of Toronto, Canada.

Namevine is one of a few very simple but very useful tools I’m building that are helpful early in the lifecycle of a company, organization or product.  I’m a firm believer in building products and tools that are personally useful, then sharing them with the internet at large, there’s bound to be people out there who can benefit.

I’m looking for work, get in touch with me if you like what you see and want to collaborate.

How Does it Make Money?

Simple.  Namevine makes money using affiliate links.  Basically if you search for a domain and its matching social media accounts here, then click through to a domain registrar to purchase a domain, Namevine will receive a small commission.

I hope our users are happy with this arrangement, I believe it’s a win-win situation.  If you disagree — no problem! — just avoid clicking the action buttons below Namevine’s search results.  But please keep in mind this is Namevine’s only form of revenue, and help me “keep the lights on”.

Why Should I Trust Namevine With My Searches?

Good question, it’s very tough to answer this one.

I can assure you that Namevine is not permanently storing any searches.  Searches are present on the servers for a couple minutes in temporary log files, but are most certainly not committed to any sort of backup or long-term storage.

User trust is really the only thing keeping Namevine going, if I breach that trust even once, then word will get out and Namevine will become a virtual ghost town. I definitely am not interested in letting this happening, so I promise I will not abuse the trust you’re placing in Namevine with each search you make.  Call or email me if you want to discuss this, my contact info is on the WHOIS record for this domain.

If your searches are of a top secret, proprietary, lose-your-job-if-anyone-finds-out-what-your-searching-for nature, then please really think through who you trust with your searches, whether it be with Namevine or another domain search provider/registrar.  Read up on Domain Name Front Running, educate yourself, and ask questions before getting started.

Why Does Namevine Tell Me a Domain or Social Media Account is Available, But It Is Really Unavailable?

Namevine was built for speed.  The whole point is to save you minutes or hours of time depending on how often you’re searching and how important it is to keep a consistent name across your domain and social media profiles.

One of the tradeoffs I made during development is to choose efficiency over perfection.  This means that Namevine reports the correct results for at least 97% or 98% of searches.  On the other hand, incorrect results are occasionally reported.  So if you do find a domain and matching social media accounts that your really want, click through to your favorite registrar for a final availability check.

If you’re seeing major problems, let me know, and I’ll sort them out.

Known problems:

  • Expiring domains - If the existing owner of a domain is letting it expire, Namevine reports it as available before you can actually register it.   This is annoying, but actually a good thing, so you’ll be able to set a reminder to register it when it does become available.
  • Generic words on Facebook - Vanity URLs like “toronto”, “vancouver”, “feedback”, etc. are all reported as available but cannot be used.  I’m building a list of these as they’re discovered, and soon Namevine will report these correctly.  Let me know if you find any.
  • Domains with invalid DNS - Namevine uses DNS records to perform domain availability checks.  This is lightning fast but does report a domain as available if its DNS is not configured.  Example: rise.com